• etfo members with flags gathered together at rally
    Feature
    Fighting Together

    Felipe Pareja argues that you don’t have to look far for causes that would benefit from the involvement and activism of teachers.

  • Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) Ontario Regional Director Erin Harrison
    Feature
    Organizing in Your Local Community

    Voice in conversation with Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) Ontario Regional Director Erin Harrison.

     

  • Zaiba Beg standing in classroom next to window and plants
    Feature
    Zaiba Beg Supporting Success

    Zaiba Beg offers frameworks for supporting English Language Learners in the classroom.

Feature
students wearing different colour shirts holding hands

At the 2015 Annual Meeting, delegates approved a Transgender Policy for ETFO.

Feature
black and grey illustration of grasshopper and plants

Choosing Resources to Represent Disability in the Classroom.

Article
By Valence Young

When workplace violence happens in schools there is a risk of physical and mental harm to both adults and children. The classroom is disrupted and the whole school community can be affected. Both Educators and students can become fearful at the prospect of violence happening again.

Article
By Amy McLaren

In 2010, I started a program called Write To Give. I wanted to help others in the developing world but I also wanted to do something different in my Grade 1 classroom.  Something fun.  Something the kids would really connect with.

For years I did a variety of things in my class to raise money for various causes.  Things like “hat days” or  “candy o’grams” or “gum days.”  They were all fun and raised some money.  But I never really felt they had a significant impact on my students.  The “meaning” or “cause” always seemed to get lost in the excitement of eating candy or wearing a hat.  So I was determined to find a solution.  

 

Article
By Donna Howey

On December 3rd, we mark the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. We’ve come a long way but people with disabilities still face barriers to inclusion in the workplace, in schools and in our society. Many aspects of disability result directly from the barriers presented by the design of our society rather than being reflective of the ability of an individual to contribute to society.  

Spotlight

Students sitting at large desks in classroom
By Mandi Hardy

The point of talking about privilege is not to make people feel bad, or guilty; it is that recognizing privilege is the only hope we have of breaking down the system to make it fairer for everyone.

Aboriginal community members marching down street
By Rachel Mishenene

On June 1, 2008, just days before the Prime Minister’s public apology to residential school survivors and their families and communities, the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) was established.

Natasha Henry standing in front of lockers
By Lauren Beckford in Conversation with Natasha Henry

I recently participated in a curriculum workshop for teachers hosted by Natasha Henry.