• women standing outside cheering
    Feature
    Building Solidarity

    Vickita Bhatt writes about responding to the Ford Conservative government by organizing with her colleagues, local parents and other community members.

  • teacher with students in hall
    Feature
    High-Rise Heroes

    Ashleigh Doherty writes about organizing with students and community members for housing equity.

  • Candy Palmater
    Feature
    Interview with Candy Palmater

    Voice in conversation with Indigenous writer, humourist and broadcaster Candy Palmater.

Feature
students and teachers holding books and articles

Rachelle Bergen asks us to consider how much we can know about women in Canadian history when the traditional focus has been the accomplishments of white men.

Feature
students holding inspirational signs

Allison Ebanks considers strategies for empowering young women students in our classrooms and challenging the stereotypes that hinder them.

Article
By Sam Hammond

When faced with a regressive government that consistently demonstrates its backwards logic, we must double down on our commitments to one another, to our collective well-being and to equity and social justice.

Article
By Sharon O’Halloran

As we worked on this women’s issue of Voice, I thought a lot about the importance of narrative, the stories we tell about ourselves and our social movements.

Article
By Izida Zorde

The summer issue of Voice is our women’s issue. It’s an opportunity to celebrate ETFO’s women members, highlight their accomplishments and centre their voices.

Spotlight

trophy
By ETFO Voice

Voice has been awarded the Canadian Association of Labour Media’s 2018 Katie FitzRandolph Award for best regular print publication.

Students sitting at large desks in classroom
By Mandi Hardy

The point of talking about privilege is not to make people feel bad, or guilty; it is that recognizing privilege is the only hope we have of breaking down the system to make it fairer for everyone.

Aboriginal community members marching down street
By Rachel Mishenene

On June 1, 2008, just days before the Prime Minister’s public apology to residential school survivors and their families and communities, the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) was established.