VOICES

Photo of a grade school classroom
Nicolette Lane

For young students witnessing violence in the classroom there may be long term effects such as anxiety or fear of returning to school.

ETFO President Sam Hammond
Sam Hammond

In Canada, the wage gap persists, even when education, occupation, experience, and hours of work are consistent.

General Secretary Sharon O’Halloran
Sharon O’Halloran

The women’s issue of Voice is special. It acknowledges the important role that women, women’s programs and women’s organizing play in the Federation.

ETFO Editor Izida Zorde
Izida Zorde

The summer issue of Voice is our women’s issue, an opportunity to focus on women members, women’s programs and women leaders in ETFO and the broader community.

Susan Swackhammer posing outside

ETFO First Vice President Susan Swackhammer is retiring this year. General Secretary Sharon O’Halloran paid tribute to her at…and still we Rise in February.

ETFO Editor Izida Zorde
Izida Zorde

In anticipation of Earth Month and in honour of the activists who have protected safe drinking water in South Dakota, protested major pipeline projects in Canada, saved US climate data from destruction under President Donald Trump and created viable earth-friendly models for development, this issue of Voice focuses on climate justice.

ETFO President Sam Hammond
Sam Hammond

We are seeing, every day, the effects of climate change and the failure of governments to address them. We are more aware than ever of the impact climate change will have on the quality of life of future generations.

ETFO General Secretary Sharon O'Halloran
Sharon O’Halloran

As a member, you have many opportunities to make your voice heard. Being active allows you to engage in important political and social issues and to connect your communities and interests with your union.

Velma Morgan

When I was a student, the only things that were taught during Black History Month were that my ancestors were enslaved and that Martin Luther King Jr fought for us. If it were not for my parents who told me about the kings and queens in Africa and the positive contributions that Black Canadians have made to society (and who helped to educate some of my teachers), I would have believed that my ancestors had accomplished nothing and were just victims in society.  

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