FEATURES

students and teachers holding books and articles

Rachelle Bergen asks us to consider how much we can know about women in Canadian history when the traditional focus has been the accomplishments of white men.

children using computers in classroom

Critical thinking is a disciplined process that requires the learner to conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize and evaluate information gathered by observation, experience, reflection, reasoning or communication.

young girl playing with legos

Teaching science and technology is an outstanding way to provide experiences that are valid, testable and repeatable.

title of the feature in graphic

For the last three years, Marietta (Mars) Bloch, B.Sc. (Hon), B.Ed., has co-ordinated the Toronto District School Board's science and technology programs, from grade 1 through secondary school.

Little girl day dreaming

As co-chair of STAO 2003, I invite all my elementary colleagues to attend the Science Teachers’ Association of Ontario annual conference. This year, the conference runs November 6-8 at the Regal Constellation Hotel, Toronto. The theme for STAO 2003 is Dreams Are Made for Pursuit.

boys sitting in classroom

The statistics are in, finally proving what everyone with an arts education has long known: boys in Canadian schools are well behind girls in academic performance, particularity in reading and writing.

3 male teachers standing in classroom

The fact is, fewer men are becoming elementary teachers. Eighteen male teachers give their insight.

children and 3 Rs

No one is in a better position to see the benefits of school nutrition programs than teachers.

photos of the exchange teachers from this article

While our teachers are away, some write wonderful letters back to us. They deserve to be shared. I hope you enjoy these excerpts and will be inspired to consider a teaching exchange at some point in your own career.

children on computers

On October 24, 2001, MNet released a second phase of findings from Young Canadians in a Wired World: The Students' View, which examined the extent to which Canadian youth are putting themselves at risk as they explore the Internet, often with little or no supervision.

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