FEATURES

students and teachers holding books and articles

Rachelle Bergen asks us to consider how much we can know about women in Canadian history when the traditional focus has been the accomplishments of white men.

ETFO President Sam Hammond speaking with media

In September 2014, ETFO began central table discussions with the government and the Ontario Public School Boards’ Association (OPSBA) to negotiate renewed collective agreements for our teacher and occasional teacher members.

Children wearing snowsuits standing near wooded area

“Why are we learning outdoors? … To wake up our brains” is the loud chorus from my Grade 2 students at Little Falls Public School. Outdoor learning is an integral part of their daily lives. These students come to school prepared; dressed in layers, with their water bottles, hats and splash pants, they are ready for a day of active learning.

woman holding paper with art on it

ETFO’s annual leadership conference for women, … and still we rise (ASWR), is known for providing inspiring ideas women educators can use to make a difference in their classrooms and communities.

Classroom full of students overseas

Project Overseas. These words hung in the back of my mind for almost a decade.

Tree branch covered in monarch butterflies

In July of 2007, my life changed forever – by attending a workshop. I remember reading the flyer. “Best workshop I’ve ever taken,” raved one teacher. Really? I wondered how they could spend three days talking about one thing – the monarch butterfly.

Comic of Stephen Harper riding on a steamroller about to run over maple leaf

ETFO traditionally has focused its political activities at the provincial level; the provincial government has the most direct impact on education policies and our members’ working conditions. Increasingly, however, ETFO has become concerned about the impact of federal policies on both our members’ welfare and the very fabric of Canadian society.

Elementary students learning music with acoustic guitars

Research shows that students’ critical thinking and creativity increase through exposure to music. Research also suggests that the mathematical abilities of children who participate in music lessons may be increased through the study of music. Yet funds are often lacking for strong music programs in Ontario schools.

Teacher dancing with elementary students holding colourful feathers

I didn’t always consider myself a dance educator. In fact, when I began my elementary teaching career I thought of myself as a math and science specialist. It wasn’t until my first professional learning experience in dance education 10 years ago that my mindset shifted about the benefits and value of dance education.

Motivational speakers hyping up crowd in gymnasium

This spring the students of Churchill Alternative School, in Ottawa, Ontario, will be marking a major milestone, as will the school staff and community.

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